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Notes

[H1] VICKERS.

Nicholas Vigrus was stewart of Tynemouth c.1295, (Laing, 17), Richard Vigrous , burgess of Roxburgh, rendered homage, 1296, (Bain, ii, p. 197), and Hugh de la Vikeres had grants of lands and burgages within the vill of Roxburgh, Kerton, etc. from Robert I, c. 1315 (RMS., i, App. ii, 128).
Thomas de Vigurws, burgess of Roxburgh, c. 1338, son and heir of umquhile Agnes called Maunsell, is referred to in the same year as Thomas dictus Vigurus ( Dryburgh, p.260,261,264; BNCH.,xxiv, p.226. He granted a burgage in the town of Roxburgh to Sir William de Feltoun, sherrif of Roxburgh, c. 1338 (Dryburgh, 313). Nothing more is known of this Thomas. He may have given name to Vigurus or Vigrous Flat. lands called Vigorushalch in the sherrifdom of Roxburghare mentioned in 1503 (HMC., xii, pt.8, p.178), in 1611 Vigoroushauche (Retours, Roxburgh, 67).
William del Vikers was juror on an inquest at Roxburgh, 1361 (Bain, iv, 62). In 1399 the abbot of Kelso granted to Thomas de Vicaria and his heirs a tenement in Wester-kelsow, temporarily held by John de Bolden (Kelso, p. 412).
Willemus de Vicar' appears as armiger in Kelso, 1396 (REA., ii, p. 292), and James Viccars of Pethhead, parish of Lesmahago, in record, 1662 (Lanark CR.).

[H153] Married at COC church, Omahu Road, Hastings, New Zealand. Reception at the Ormilie Lodge Hotel, Taradale.

[H2] LEDINGHAM

A surname found in Aberdeenshire. George Ledinghame is recorded in Auchinlek in 1574 (RSCA., i, p. 217). John Liddinghame in Cheppiltoune was charged to underlie the law for assault in 1603. (ibid., ii, p. 45), and George Ledingham was a member of the Gartly Company of Volunteers in 1798 (Will, p. 24). Ledigan was the form of the surname in Mar in the seventeenth century.
There is a place Ledikin in Culsalmond which was spelled Lethinghame in 1644 and Ledinghame in 1600 (Macdonald, Place names of west Aberdeenshire), and Prof. Mackinnon compared it with Leideag, pl. Leideagan, "a common name for fields, especially those on outskirts of farms, in the West Highlands". (loc. cit). Andrew Ledingham from Turriff was killed in the first Great War (Tuffiff).

[H3] Birth address 87 Restalrig Road, Edinburgh.

Birth registered 4/10/1921, Portobello.

[H4] Nickname is "Holliewog"

[H5] Died as baby.

[H6] A tailor, lost a leg in WW1
On marriage cert, was of 15 Raes Buildings, South Canongate, Edinburgh
Witnesses at wedding, Nellie McDonald & William McBain.
Regd Nov 10 1910
Died at home.

In 1901 census was apprentice tailor

[H7] On marriage cert, was of 30 Greenside, Edinburgh

[H8] My grandad, lived in 7 Sunnybank Place, Edinburgh. Worked on railways.
Was a railway shunter (occupation on dad's birth certificate), and later a railway yard inspector.

Birth certificate states he was illegitimate.

Married at St Josephs Chapel, Peebels, Scotland.

Was in the 3/8th batallion of the Royal Scots a private.

His address was Jewel Cottages, Portobello, Edinburgh, Scotland.

His address when married was Jewel Cotages, Portobello.

[H9] Birth regd 13 July 1920

[H10] Known as Cissie.

[H154] Married by Adam Hunter

[H11] Known as Mamie.

[H12] Auntie Lena, of Lithuanian extraction, but born in Bellshill hospital, near Glasgow.

[H13] A Coal Miner, on the death certificate, it stated his occupation as a retired Colliery Oversman.
On his second marriage certificate, listed as a colliery surface overseer.

In the 1881 census, he was living with sister Helen, aged 15, and father Ramsay, aged 54, at Plummers Close, Dalkeith. His occupation was Grocers Message Boy.

In the 1891 census, he was living in Stobhill, Midlothian, listed as an unmarried coalminer aged 23. His address was 3 Crichton's
Land. He boarded with the Learmonth family, consisting of Robert & Agnes, and their 3 children Annie, Francis & John, all under 6 years
old.

Address on first marriage certificate was 4 St Davids Terrace, Edinburgh.
Address on second marriage certificate was 155 Jewel Cottages, Portobello.
Second marriage registered 11/3/1935.

1901 census family were in Northumberland living at 6 Wood Row Cowpen Morpeth

It looks like he moved into the house of his second wife afer marriage.
Found dead at home, Eskview Terrace, Mussleburgh, aged 83 years.

The informant on the death certificate was James A Thomson, son in Law, of 2 St Pillans Pl. Edinburgh.

Death registered 30/1/1952.

[H14] Birth address listed as 12 New Buildings, Ormiston, nr Edinburgh, Scotland.

Birth regd 4/3/1908.

[H15] Witness at wedding, Douglas Vickers, brother, and Lizzie Landles Peacock
Prior to marriage lived at 155 Jewel Cottages, Newcraighall.
Occupation listed as Domestic Servant

After marriage moved to Australia on the ship "Windhuk" with her new husband John Francis Bock.
Travelling dates 19/6/1919 to 21/8/1919, arriving at Sydney.

[H16] Witnesses at wedding:

Thomas Andrew Westwood, 16 Comiston Road, Edinburgh
Margaret MacPherson, Station House, Leith Walk, Edinburgh.

[H17] My father Archibald Vickers' birth certificate states his mother's birth name was Locke.

This may have been because she was born before her mother married her father?

Address on the marriage certificate was 40 Old Town, Peebles.

More info from Nigel Harrity - DOB, death etc.

[H18] A domestic servant

Listed in 1881 census as domestic servant, working for James Melrose, a farmer of 100 acres in Peebles.

[H19] Died as baby.

[H20] A shoemaker, specialised in shoes for Scottish highland dancing.

[H21] Probably born in 1918, died age 8 of rheumatic fever.

[H22] A retired shoemaker, and life long communist who listened to Radio Moscow on the short wave, and had several holidays there too.

Lived at 50 George Street, Peebles before he died.

[H23] Killed in the latter stages of WW1 - source, Mr D Fleming, Ormiston

Middle name possibly Mitchell?

GRO Codes 1. 683 3. 186

[H24] Lived in America, had a son and daughter.

[H25] Born at 5:35 am. We expected a girl as a scan at 20 weeks was reported as showing a female baby!

[H26] The father of Agnes was not recorded on the birth certificate.

Agnes was the widow of Ramsay Vickers, a coal miner who died at Gorebridge, on 28/11/1892. This is from wifes 2nd marriage cert.

Or more likely, 28/11/1981, in Stobhill, brother Archie present. This is from death cert.
She later married Archibald Vickers.

Address on her first marriage certificate was 36 Dee St, West Calder. Hard to read.

Address on her second marriage certificate (ie marriage to Archiebald Vickers) was 4 St Davids Terrace, Edinburgh.

Occupation was a domestic servant.

Died of chronic rheumatiod arthritis and cardiac failure aged 66.

[H27] Belived to have died age 29, at Gorebridge. I wonder if this was a pit accident.
This info from wifes 2nd marriage cert.
His death cert states he died at Robertson bank, Parish of Bothwick, of Phthysis Pulmonalis. Brother Archie present.
Death registered Nov 30 1891, Stobhill.

His widow, Agnes married his brother, Archibald Vickers.

Birth registered 29/9/1862, in Dalkeith. Or maybe this was another Ramsay?

Address at time of marriage, 36 Dee Street, West Calder.

A Ramsay Vickers of this age lived in W calder at time of 1891 census, as did an Agnes Vickers! Archibald Vickers, Ramsay's brother, and Agnes's second husband, was in Stobhill, during the 1891 census, and this is where Archibald, their first child was born.

Both parents were dead at the time of his marriage. Witnesses at wedding were David Hardie and Barbara Gordon.

I think this DOB is probably correct, his birth cert states his mother was Alice Weighand, not Wiggans. Who knows.

Featured in 1891 census, living with wife Agnes, with m-in law Margaret Stevenson, aged 48 living there also.

Occupation listed as shale miner.

In 1881 census was a solder at Peirshill barracks, Jocks Lodge, Edinburgh

On marriage cert of Ramsay Carden Vickers and Mary Ballantyne, 18/12/1918 he was recorded as being a baker, deceased

[H28] A Domestic Servant.

She later married David Hunter. ? is this correct?

Possibly Henery or Hendry?

[H29] Occupation - coal miner
On some certificates, known as Vickars, which was probably a clerical error.
In the 1881 census as "Vicars", living with son Archie and Daughter Helen.

Infomant of death, son Ramsay.
Death regd 11/3/1889

OPR 675/3, record of birth

THE SCOTSMAN 20 OCTOBER 1847
POACHING AFFRAY
On Monday evening a serious encounter, took place between a party of poachers and a party of gamekeepers in a plantation near Dalhousie Castle, Parish of Cockpen. The poachers were eight in number, and all of them were colliers from the neighbouring village of Gowkeshill. The gamekeepers were five in number; two of them being in the service of the Earl of Dalhousie; two in that of Mr. Ramsay of Arniston. It appears that the gamekeepers had assembled in such force, in consequence of bands of poachers having been for some days past,
peramulating the woods at Dalhousie. On the gamekeepers coming within sight of the poachers; two of the latter presented their guns and threatened to shoot the first that approached. The gamekeepers, nothing daunted, continued to advance, when a couple of shots were fired, one of which took effect on the leg of Mr. Hume, head-gamekeeper to the Earl of Dalhousie. A determined struggle then took place between the parties in the course of which Mr. White, the keeper of Mr. Dundas of Arniston, received a severe wound on the head, either from the butt-end of a gun or from a heavy bludgeon. The gamekeepers eventually overcame their opponents and secured of one of them of the name of Beveridge, information of the affray having been sent to the county police
station at Gorebridge, a party of constables proceeded to the village of Gowkeshill yesterday morning and apprehended four of the poachers named Vicars, and one named Wise; so that there are now in all six individuals in custody, and two still at large. Hume we believe was in a very dangerous state.

Confession to the assault of the Gamekeepers
The pannels being interrogated in the libel by the covel, they all pleaded guilty of the offence specified in the Ninth section of the statue as libelled. The Pannel William Vickers pleaded guilty also of the assault on Archibald White as libelled, but not to the danger of life, and the pannel Alexander Vickers pleaded guilty also to the assault by shooting at Robert Hume as libelled to effusion of blood but only to the injury of the hit person, and the pannels William Vickers and George Vickers authorise their councils to sign this confession for them in respect that they can not write
Signed William Beveridge, Alexander Vickers Ramsay Vickers
Harry Ritchie for William & George Vickers [7 January 1848]

Judges Sentence (of William, Alexander, George & Ramsay Vickers & William Beveridge)
The Lords Commissioners of Justiciary discern and adjudge the pennels William Vickers and Alexander Vickers to be transported beyond -------- for the period of seven years from this date and that powers ------------ contained in the acts of Parliament made hereto and order them to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh till removed for transportation and further discern and adjudge the pennels William Beveridge, George Vickers and Ramsay Vickers to be taken from the bar to the prison of Edinburgh and from hence to be forthwith conveyed to and imprisoned in the general prison at Perth for the period of
eight months from this date provided they can be received there in terms of the rules thereof and if they cannot be so received then to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh aforesaid for the said period and thereafter to be set at liberty.
Court Records @ West Register House [7 January 1848]

[H30] Occupation listed as M.S. Weighand

[H31] A Coal Miner.

[H32] Address at time of marriage: 23 Eskview Tce, Mussleburgh.

A widow, her first husband's name must have been Urquhart, as the name on the cert was Urquhart.

[H33] Ref IGI

Also known as Wiggans in some sources

[H34] A Gas Stoker
On mariage cert, a ploughman

Address: Gas Works Cottages, Eshils, Nr Peebles (on death cert)
Source - Nigel Harrity

First House: Old Town Peebles, 1881-82
Part time fireman, helped put out the fire that destroyed the Peebles Hydo Hotel in 1905. It was rebuilt in 1911

[H35] A Cooper.
Listed in 1891 census as app cooper.

ref 1887 685/4 173

Birth regd 1/3/1877, father present at birth.

Born at 1:15 a.m.

In 1901 census lived at 13 Rae's Buildings Canongate Edinburgh with wife, F in law and B in law

[H36] A Cooper

Living at 5 Dumbiedykes Road in the 1881 census

[H37] A Cooper
Lived in the Canongate district of Edinburgh, there is a reference in the 1891 census to be followed up.
Did indeed, 4 Raes Buildings, Canongate. Was a brewery cooper.

In 1881 census, lived at 18a Holyrood Square, Edinburgh.

Census ref 685/3 046 021

In 1881 census, they had a boarder, 66 year old Andrew Clark living with them.

Marriage ref 1876 685/3 260
Address at time of marriage, 54 St Mary's St, Edinburgh

[H38] Occupation on marriage cert, domestic servant, of 2 Chessels Court, Canongate

[H39] Enlisted with the Australian army on 13th jan 1915. Age on attestation papers stated he was 28 years 4 months at the time. Occupation was "timber getter". Lived in Cooktown, Queensland, prior to joining the army. On his marriage papers 3 years later he was 26!. He reached rank of Corporal.
His military number: 6480

In 1927 he worked on the telegraph line at Mareeba, Queensland.

He was a Roman Catholic.

He received the following WW1 medals: 1914/15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

[H40] Mechanic (source - son John's marriage papers)

[H155] Marriage regd 26 April 1909 Blair Atholl

[H41] Born at Tauranga Hospital at 7PM, weighing 8lb 1 oz

[H42] OPR 676/2
Of Parish of Lasswade
Marriage: OPR 691/4, 676/2

Listed in 1841 census in Old Monkland, a coal miner.
2 of his sons, Christopher, and William, are listed there at the same time, living with their own families.

[H43] Of Parish of Cockpen
cnsus 1851 living in Bonnyrigg with daughter Fanny, a widow at the time

[H44] OPR 676/2

THE SCOTSMAN 20 OCTOBER 1847
POACHING AFFRAY
On Monday evening a serious encounter, took place between a party of poachers and a party of gamekeepers in a plantation near Dalhousie Castle, Parish of Cockpen. The poachers were eight in number, and all of them were colliers from the neighbouring village of Gowkeshill. The gamekeepers were five in number; two of them being in the service of the Earl of Dalhousie; two in that of Mr. Ramsay of Arniston. It appears that the gamekeepers had assembled in such force, in consequence of bands of poachers having been for some days past,
peramulating the woods at Dalhousie. On the gamekeepers coming within sight of the poachers; two of the latter presented their guns and threatened to shoot the first that approached. The gamekeepers, nothing daunted, continued to advance, when a couple of shots were fired, one of which took effect on the leg of Mr. Hume, head-gamekeeper to the Earl of Dalhousie. A determined struggle then took place between the parties in the course of which Mr. White, the keeper of Mr. Dundas of Arniston, received a severe wound on the head, either from the butt-end of a gun or from a heavy bludgeon. The gamekeepers eventually overcame their opponents and secured of one of them of the name of Beveridge, information of the affray having been sent to the county police
station at Gorebridge, a party of constables proceeded to the village of Gowkeshill yesterday morning and apprehended four of the poachers named Vicars, and one named Wise; so that there are now in all six individuals in custody, and two still at large. Hume we believe was in a very dangerous state.

Confession to the assault of the Gamekeepers
The pannels being interrogated in the libel by the covel, they all pleaded guilty of the offence specified in the Ninth section of the statue as libelled. The Pannel William Vickers pleaded guilty also of the assault on Archibald White as libelled, but not to the danger of life, and the pannel Alexander Vickers pleaded guilty also to the assault by shooting at Robert Hume as libelled to effusion of blood but only to the injury of the hit person, and the pannels William Vickers and George Vickers authorise their councils to sign this confession for them in respect that they can not write
Signed William Beveridge, Alexander Vickers Ramsay Vickers
Harry Ritchie for William & George Vickers [7 January 1848]

Judges Sentence (of William, Alexander, George & Ramsay Vickers & William Beveridge)
The Lords Commissioners of Justiciary discern and adjudge the pennels William Vickers and Alexander Vickers to be transported beyond -------- for the period of seven years from this date and that powers ------------ contained in the acts of Parliament made hereto and order them to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh till removed for transportation and further discern and adjudge the pennels William Beveridge, George Vickers and Ramsay Vickers to be taken from the bar to the prison of Edinburgh and from hence to be forthwith conveyed to and imprisoned in the general prison at Perth for the period of
eight months from this date provided they can be received there in terms of the rules thereof and if they cannot be so received then to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh aforesaid for the said period and thereafter to be set at liberty.
Court Records @ West Register House [7 January 1848]

1851 Census, they lived at 22 Gowkshill, and Alexander's brother John resided there as well.

[H45] OPR 676/2

Living in old Monlands at time of 1841 census, with family Margaret, (Snedden in census), and children Christina, Helen & William.

[H46] OPR 676/2
Buried at Newbattle Burial Ground
A Miner, lived in Gorebridge most of his life
Married by Rev Thomas Pilearin

THE SCOTSMAN 20 OCTOBER 1847
POACHING AFFRAY
On Monday evening a serious encounter, took place between a party of poachers and a party of gamekeepers in a plantation near Dalhousie Castle, Parish of Cockpen. The poachers were eight in number, and all of them were colliers from the neighbouring village of Gowkeshill. The gamekeepers were five in number; two of them being in the service of the Earl of Dalhousie; two in that of Mr. Ramsay of Arniston. It appears that the gamekeepers had assembled in such force, in consequence of bands of poachers having been for some days past,
peramulating the woods at Dalhousie. On the gamekeepers coming within sight of the poachers; two of the latter presented their guns and threatened to shoot the first that approached. The gamekeepers, nothing daunted, continued to advance, when a couple of shots were fired, one of which took effect on the leg of Mr. Hume, head-gamekeeper to the Earl of Dalhousie. A determined struggle then took place between the parties in the course of which Mr. White, the keeper of Mr. Dundas of Arniston, received a severe wound on the head, either from the butt-end of a gun or from a heavy bludgeon. The gamekeepers eventually overcame their opponents and secured of one of them of the name of Beveridge, information of the affray having been sent to the county police
station at Gorebridge, a party of constables proceeded to the village of Gowkeshill yesterday morning and apprehended four of the poachers named Vicars, and one named Wise; so that there are now in all six individuals in custody, and two still at large. Hume we believe was in a very dangerous state.

Confession to the assault of the Gamekeepers
The pannels being interrogated in the libel by the covel, they all pleaded guilty of the offence specified in the Ninth section of the statue as libelled. The Pannel William Vickers pleaded guilty also of the assault on Archibald White as libelled, but not to the danger of life, and the pannel Alexander Vickers pleaded guilty also to the assault by shooting at Robert Hume as libelled to effusion of blood but only to the injury of the hit person, and the pannels William Vickers and George Vickers authorise their councils to sign this confession for them in respect that they can not write
Signed William Beveridge, Alexander Vickers Ramsay Vickers
Harry Ritchie for William & George Vickers [7 January 1848]

Judges Sentence (of William, Alexander, George & Ramsay Vickers & William Beveridge)
The Lords Commissioners of Justiciary discern and adjudge the pennels William Vickers and Alexander Vickers to be transported beyond -------- for the period of seven years from this date and that powers ------------ contained in the acts of Parliament made hereto and order them to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh till removed for transportation and further discern and adjudge the pennels William Beveridge, George Vickers and Ramsay Vickers to be taken from the bar to the prison of Edinburgh and from hence to be forthwith conveyed to and imprisoned in the general prison at Perth for the period of
eight months from this date provided they can be received there in terms of the rules thereof and if they cannot be so received then to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh aforesaid for the said period and thereafter to be set at liberty.
Court Records @ West Register House [7 January 1848]

Possibly in Old Monklands at time of 1841 census. A William is there, with a wife Jean, and children Helen & Elizabeth, but ages are not too accurate.
Christopher Vickers (brother) and family were there ,as was his father William and his other siblings also.

[H161] INFORMATION FOR JOHN VICKERS
15TH JUNE 2000

1. Details of entry in Cockpen 1851 census for family of William Vickers and wife Jean Flockhart.

William - Shown on 1851 census for Cockpen aged 38 years, a coal miner, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Midlothian, with his wife Jane and children Helen, Elizabeth, Robert and Jane.

Jean - Shown on 1851 census, named Jane, aged 35 years, born Monkland, Lanarkshire, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen with her husband William Vickers and their children.

Helen - Shown on 1851 census aged 13 years, a Lint Spinner, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen with her parents and siblings.

Elisbeath (born about 1840, not your Elizabeth born 1835 - do you think they are one and the same, where did your Elizabeth come from?) - Shown on 1851 census aged 13 years, a Lint Spinner, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen with her parents and siblings.

Robert - Shown on 1851 census aged 4 years, named as Robert, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen, with his parents and siblings.

Jane - Shown on 1851 census aged 4 months, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen with her parents and siblings.

Therefore I have the family page for this group as follows: - (I have reduced the narrative for William and son Robert to reduce the size of the file)

Descendants of William Vickers

Generation No. 1

1. WILLIAM2 VICKERS (WILLIAM1)1 was born 4 July 1812 in Skipmuir, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland1,2, and died 24 January 1855 in Skittesmuir, Gorebridge, Midlothian, Scotland3. He married JEAN FLOCKHART3 13 March 1835 in Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland3. She was born Abt. 1816 in Monkland, Lanarkshire, Scotland4, and died Aft. 30 March 1851.

Notes for WILLIAM VICKERS:
OPR 676/2
Buried at Newbattle Burial Ground
A Miner, lived in Gorebridge all his life
Married by Rev Thomas Pilearin

Shown on 1851 census for Cockpen aged 38 years, a coal miner, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Midlothian, with his wife Jane and children Helen, Elizabeth, Robert and Jane.

More About WILLIAM VICKERS:
Cause of Death: Suppression of urine in cholera5
Christened: 30 July 1812, Parish of Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland5
Occupation: 30 March 1851, Coal Miner6

Notes for JEAN FLOCKHART:
Shown on 1851 census, named Jane, aged 35 years, born Monkland, Lanarkshire, living at 23 Gowkshill with her husband William Vickers and their children.

Children of WILLIAM VICKERS and JEAN FLOCKHART are:
i. ELIZABETH3 VICKERS7, b. 18357.

Notes for ELIZABETH VICKERS:
[Vickers.FTW]

Ref: Colin Wilson
A Linen Spinner

ii. HELEN VICKERS7, b. 1837, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland7,8.

Notes for HELEN VICKERS:
Shown on 1851 census aged 13 years, a Lint Spinner, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen with her parents and siblings.

More About HELEN VICKERS:
Occupation: 30 March 1851, Lint Spinner9

iii. ELISBEATH VICKERS, b. 1840, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland10.

Notes for ELISBEATH VICKERS:
Shown on 1851 census aged 11 years, a Lint Spinner, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen with her parents and siblings.

More About ELISBEATH VICKERS:
Occupation: 30 March 1851, Lint Spinner10

iv. WILLIAM VICKERS11, b. 184211.
v. ROBERT FLOCKHART VICKERS11, b. 1846, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland11,12,13; d. 31 March 1884, Calton Prison, Edinburgh, executed14; m. ESTHER HARE14, 23 October 1868, Easthouses, Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland14; b. Abt. 1849, Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland15.

Notes for ROBERT FLOCKHART VICKERS:
Shown on 1851 census aged 4 years, named as Robert, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen, with his parents and siblings.

Shown on 1881 Midlothian census aged 34 years, born Cockpen, a Coal Miner living at Gowkshill, Cockpen with his wife Esther and children William, Janet, John, Alexander, Robert, Jane and Ellen.

More About ROBERT FLOCKHART VICKERS:
Occupation: 4 April 1881, Coal Miner15

Notes for ESTHER HARE:
Shown on 1881 census aged 31 years, born Newbattle, living with her husband Robert and their children at Gowkshill, Cockpen.

More About ESTHER HARE:
Occupation: Field Worker16

vi. JANE VICKERS17, b. Abt. December 1850, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland17,18.

Notes for JANE VICKERS:
Shown on 1851 census aged 4 months, born Cockpen, living at 23 Gowkshill, Cockpen with her parents and siblings.

vii. ALEXANDER VICKERS19, b. 185219.

Notes for ALEXANDER VICKERS:
[Vickers.FTW]

Ref David Gee

Endnotes

1. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.
2. 1851 Census, for Cockpen 676/5/27.
3. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.
4. 1851 Census, for Cockpen 676/5/27.
5. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.
6. 1851 Census, of Cockpen 676/5/27.
7. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.
8. 1851 Census, for Cockpen 676/5/27.
9. 1851 Census, of Cockpen 676/5/27.
10. 1851 Census, for Cockpen 676/5/28.
11. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.
12. 1881 Midlothian Census, Cockpen 698-B/2/52 (LDS).
13. 1851 Census, for Cockpen 676/5/28.
14. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.
15. 1881 Midlothian Census, Cockpen 698-B/2/32 (LDS).
16. Family Tree Maker file dated 13th July 2000 from John Vickers.
17. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.
18. 1851 Census, for Cockpen 676/5/28.
19. Vickers.FTW, Date of Import: 13 Jun 2000.

[H47] OPR 676/2

THE SCOTSMAN 20 OCTOBER 1847
POACHING AFFRAY
On Monday evening a serious encounter, took place between a party of poachers and a party of gamekeepers in a plantation near Dalhousie Castle, Parish of Cockpen. The poachers were eight in number, and all of them were colliers from the neighbouring village of Gowkeshill. The gamekeepers were five in number; two of them being in the service of the Earl of Dalhousie; two in that of Mr. Ramsay of Arniston. It appears that the gamekeepers had assembled in such force, in consequence of bands of poachers having been for some days past,
peramulating the woods at Dalhousie. On the gamekeepers coming within sight of the poachers; two of the latter presented their guns and threatened to shoot the first that approached. The gamekeepers, nothing daunted, continued to advance, when a couple of shots were fired, one of which took effect on the leg of Mr. Hume, head-gamekeeper to the Earl of Dalhousie. A determined struggle then took place between the parties in the course of which Mr. White, the keeper of Mr. Dundas of Arniston, received a severe wound on the head, either from the butt-end of a gun or from a heavy bludgeon. The gamekeepers eventually overcame their opponents and secured of one of them of the name of Beveridge, information of the affray having been sent to the county police
station at Gorebridge, a party of constables proceeded to the village of Gowkeshill yesterday morning and apprehended four of the poachers named Vicars, and one named Wise; so that there are now in all six individuals in custody, and two still at large. Hume we believe was in a very dangerous state.

Confession to the assault of the Gamekeepers
The pannels being interrogated in the libel by the covel, they all pleaded guilty of the offence specified in the Ninth section of the statue as libelled. The Pannel William Vickers pleaded guilty also of the assault on Archibald White as libelled, but not to the danger of life, and the pannel Alexander Vickers pleaded guilty also to the assault by shooting at Robert Hume as libelled to effusion of blood but only to the injury of the hit person, and the pannels William Vickers and George Vickers authorise their councils to sign this confession for them in respect that they can not write
Signed William Beveridge, Alexander Vickers Ramsay Vickers
Harry Ritchie for William & George Vickers [7 January 1848]

Judge=92s Sentence (of William, Alexander, George & Ramsay Vickers & William Beveridge)
The Lords Commissioners of Justiciary discern and adjudge the pennels William Vickers and Alexander Vickers to be transported beyond -------- for the period of seven years from this date and that powers ------------ contained in the acts of Parliament made hereto and order them to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh till removed for transportation and further discern and adjudge the pennels William Beveridge, George Vickers and Ramsay Vickers to be taken from the bar to the prison of Edinburgh and from hence to be forthwith conveyed to and imprisoned in the general prison at Perth for the period of
eight months from this date provided they can be received there in terms of the rules thereof and if they cannot be so received then to be detained in the prison of Edinburgh aforesaid for the said period and thereafter to be set at liberty.
Court Records @ West Register House [7 January 1848]

[H48] OPR 676/2

[H49] OPR 676/2

James Dobbie and Janet Dobbie (nee Vickers)

They left Liverpool in 1852 on the ?Medina? bound for Adelaide as assisted migrants. I am not sure that they really wanted to go to Adelaide more that it was where the free passage took them. One child died on passage. At the time the Victorian gold rush had begun and they stayed about 4 years in South Australia before walking to Campbells Creek in Victoria (very near Castlemaine) where James and his brother Thomas were initially engaged in fossicking for alluvial gold. This ran out very quickly as there were more than 6,000 Chinese on that particular field. Once the alluvial gold ran out reef gold was mined from the quartz and both James and Thomas were employed in the Cumberland Reef mine until the mid 1860?s. Poorly designed machinery finally closed the mine and they moved on. One child died at Campbells Creek from dysentery. James and Janet went to the Gippsland region most probably because coal was being mined there. My great grandfather Robert was born in Gippsland. Thomas and his family stayed in the gold fields region and I am presently looking at what family remains from them.

James? family moved to Newcastle at some stage (I have not been able to determine the date yet) and James was employed as an overseer in a coal mine at Wallsend (a suburb of Newcastle). None of their children became miners to the best of my knowledge. Ramsay became a policeman, John a school teacher, Robert a locomotive driver, William a railway guard and George an innkeeper. One more of their children died in Newcastle as an infant.

The family has settled and grown mostly in the Newcastle and Hunter Valley region with one large pocket in the Sydney area. I am the odd one out having moved to Tasmania about 23 years ago.

I am travelling to Scotland in July this year with my wife Lorraine to visit the Edinburgh area and some of the coal mining heritage facilities there. We will also do the tattoo and other tourist related things before heading to Europe for a month.

Ken Dobbie

[H50] OPR 676/3

[H51] Occupation in 1891 census: message boy
In 1901 census, apprentice iron moulder

[H52] Ref 1881 685/3 496

Born at 8:37 hrs.

Father present at birth, birth regd may 10th 1881

In 1901 census was a cooper

[H53] A labourer, deceased before 3/11/1876

Witneses at Wedding, William Rankin, Maggie Weatherhead

[H54] In 1881 census living in Market St Inveresk with sons Adam and george. Only 3 at home, her sons were bakers.

[H55] info from Helen Mason

[H56] The famous Edinburgh murderer!

Source: David Gee.

The Glasgow Herald, Tuesday April 1, 1884. Page 7
DOUBLE EXECUTION IN EDINBURGH
At ten minutes past eight o'clock yesterday morning,
Robert Flockhart Vickers and William Innes suffered
the extreme penalty of the law for the murder, in
December last, of two gamekeepers on the estate of
Rosebery. The execution took place within the Calton
Prison at Edinburgh, and conducted in private, only
officials, three clergymen and representatives of five
newspapers being allowed to be present. As the
reports which have appeared within the past few days
have shown, the prisoners confessed their guilt, and,
having no hope of pardon, have been preparing
themselves by attention to the ministrations of the
Rev Mr Wilson, the Rev Mr Keay, the Rev Mr M'Alpine
and the Prison Chaplain, for the fate which awaited
them. On Sunday, the last day they had to spend on
earth, they were engaged for a considerable time in
reading and hearing the Bible read to them and in
prayer. The Rev Mr Wilson, lately parish minister of
Cramond, now of St Michael's. Merchiston, was with
Vickers till ten o'clock in the evening. Both the
convicts retired to bed very shortly thereafter, and
rested well until about five o'clock yesterday
morning, when they arose and dressed. After taking
breakfast, Vickers had an interview with the Rev Mr
Wilson with whom he engaged in conversation for a
considerable time. He entrusted Mr Wilson with
several messages of love and counsel to his wife and
children, and said he hoped and believed that the
event which was so soon to take place would be 'rest
for him'. He deplored the bad example he had shown
his children and the evil effects which his conduct
might entail upon them; but that which cheered and
pleased the reverend gentleman most was that the
doomed man requested him to call on the families of
the murdered gamekeepers to express his sorrow at the
trouble he had brought upon them, and to say that he
died praying for them along with his own wife and
family. At Innes's own request the Rev Mr Keay
waited upon him yesterday at six o'clock and remained
with him until the hour of execution.
Outside the prison walls, the first indication that
anything unusual was about to take place was the
assembling on Waterloo Road and of the southern slopes
of the Calton Hill of little groups of men and boys.
By and by the little groups clustered more closely
together and gradually a large crowd, numbering around
5,000, which included a few females, congregated as
near as possible to the only point of view from which
a glimpse could be obtained of a portion of the roof
of the wooden shed within which the execution was to
take place. Many seemed to belong to the mining
classes, some of whom, having acquaintance with the
prisoners, had come in from Gorebridge in the morning.
There were no demonstrations of feeling. Silence
prevailed everywhere, the vast crown waiting anxiously
the moment when the hoisting of the black flag should
announce that all was over. Some time after seven
o'clock, Bailies Roberts and Clark, the Magistrates
deputed to see the death warrant carried out,
accompanied by three of the city officers, were
admitted within the prison gate. The clerk to the
Magistrates, the medical officer of health and the
prison surgeon, with the chief constable of Edinburgh,
the governor of the prison and other officials were in
attendance. At twenty-five minutes to eight o'clock
the Magistrates, having donned their robes of office,
proceeded to a building at the south-eastern extremity
of the prison. In the surgeon's room there, a little
chamber on the first floor, preparations had been made
for a brief service, and into this room the prisoners
were led. From the time of their trial until that
moment they had not seen each one another, although
they had sent through the clergymen, many kindly
messages of mutual comfort and encouragement. Now,
however, as they left their respective cells for the
last time, they met on the landing leading to the
surgeon's room, and shaking hands, greeted each other
warmly, but with deep emotion which each endeavoured
to conceal. Little time was allowed for words; and
the men, walking behind the prison chaplain and the
minister of St Michael's, entered the surgeon's room
and seated themselves on the cairs disposed for them
in front of the little meeting. The men were quite
calm, but the expression on their faces showed how
deeply they realised their position. . . .
. . . The chaplain having addressed a few parting
words to the men, the Rev Mr Wilson offered up a
solemn and impressive prayer, and then addressed
Vickers and Innes, enjoining them to be brave and
strong in the strength of their position as humble,
penitent, believing sinners with full reliance on the
mercy of God, and to let the last act of their life be
a perfect surrender of their souls into the hand of
Christ. Then would their first awakening in the life
to come be a realisation of the truth. 'Though your
sins be as scarlet they shall be as white as snow'.
The 'Amen' which followed this exhortation was joined
in by everyone present, of whom many were deeply
affected.
The executioner, James Berry, with his assistant
Richard Chester, who like his principal, is a Bradford
man, were then admitted. On their entrance, the
prisoners rose and shook hands with most of those who
had been auditors of the brief religious service and
with the executioners. They then allowed themselves
to be pinioned, during which operation the Magistrates
and others left the room, and proceeded to the place
of execution. This was only a few paces distant, at
the end of the corridor leading from the cells. The
door of the corridor opened upon the platform of the
scaffold. Scarcely two paces forward, hung from a
huge cross-beam the fatal cords, slightly coiled and
with nooses all ready. A low barricade, about three
feet high draped in black, ran round three sides of
the false floor, leaving the side to the corridor
open. Scarcely had the officials and others taken
their places than the voice of the Rev Mr Wilson was
head reciting the words of the 1st, 2nd and 9th verses
of the 51st psalm; and Mr Wilson continued reading
until the drop fell from Luke XV, the 18th, 19th, 22nd
and 23rd verses, and the 1st, 3rd and 4th verses of
the 5th Scripture hymn.
Meantime the executioner and his assistant, quietly
and unostentatiously, but remarkable readiness and
skill, proceeded with their work. Vickers and Innes,
having taken their places on the scaffold, Berry and
his assistant quickly drew the white caps over their
heads. Up to this time the unhappy men had shown no
sign of emotion. There was nothing defiant, nothing
self-confident in their mien of bearing. Resignation
to their fate seemed to have taken possession of them,
and so resigned they were able unflinchingly and
without betraying any weakness to walk to the
scaffold. When the cap had been adjusted, however,
Vickers in on of the momentary pauses in the reading
of scripture spoke in tremulous tones, but loud enough
to be heard by all 
"Lord have mercy on me a sinner".
The words were taken up and repeated by his fellow
sufferer and the prayer found an echo in the hearts of
those around.
In tones of deep feeling, Vickers now exclaimed 
"Lord, bless my wife and family!"
"Lord bless them all " came like an antiphon from
Innes.
Everything was now in readiness. The nooses were
carefully adjusted and the medical officers examined
them and found them properly placed. The whole
operations at the scaffold had not occupied more that
3three or four minutes. The minister had just read
the line of the hymn, "And to the friendless, prove a
friend" when one last prayer, "Lord, remember me",
rose from the lips of the unhappy men, and the signal
was given. The bolt fell, the men disappeared
instantaneously. For a second or two the ropes
quivered, and then all was still. Death appeared to
have been instantaneous.
When all was over, there was no delay made in leaving
the melancholy surroundings. The Magistrates and
officials adjourned to sign the necessary papers, and
to arrange for the post-mortem examination of the
bodies. Immediately after the execution, the black
flag was hoisted over the prison and the prison bell
tolled dismally for half an hour.
Berry, the executioner, and his assistant are being
very highly spoken of by the prison and other
authorities for the manner in which they discharged
their part of the painful work. Berry is a young
man, probably between 30 and 35 years of age, of
medium height, with intelligent features and smart
active manner. He assisted Marwood on many
occasions, and seemed thoroughly experienced in the
work which he had to do. His assistant appears
slightly older than himself, less intelligent looking
and of stronger build. Both are from Bradford, and
both are teetotallers and members of the Wesleyan
denomination. At the execution yesterday, Berry used
a rope five-eighths of an inch in diameter. The drop
allowed for Vickers was eight feet six inches and for
Innes, who was the lighter man, ten feet. The
hangman Berry has been requested to proceed to London
to meet the Sheriffs of Middlesex.

THE INQUIRY
NARRATIVE OF THE CRIME
(Yet to copy out these accounts from the microfilm of
the paper).

Previous reports in The Glasgow Herald 
Monday, March 31, 1884, page 6. EDINBURGH  THE
GOREBRIDGE MURDERS  REPRIEVE REFUSED by the Home
Secretary. . . . . In the course of the forenoon
(Saturday), the Rev George Wilson, St Michael's E.C
communicated to the unhappy convicts the intimation
that there was now no hope of the execution of the
sentence being delayed and they received the
announcement with apparent resignation as if they had
already prepared their minds for the worst. On
Saturday afternoon, the last interview between the
convicts and their wives and families took place and
it is said to have been a most affecting one.
James Brady, the executioner . . . . . . has been in
Edinburgh since Thursday. He and his assistant have
been living within the Calton Prison and on Saturday
afternoon they had a carriage airing round Queen's
Drive.

Monday 24th March 1884  On Saturday afternoon, the
condemned prisoner Innes was visited by his wife and
family. The interview which lasted for some time was
of a painful character. As yet, the other condemned
man, Vickers has not been visited by any of his
relations.

Wednesday March 19, 1884  Seven of the jurymen who
tried Vickers and Innes for the murder of the
gamekeepers at Gorebridge have now signed the memorial
for a reprieve and an eighth has promised also to
sign. The foreman of the jury has refused to adhibit
his name to the document. Some 500 persons are said
to have signed the memorial in the Gorebridge
district.

[H57] The Photo:

1. The old lady is Esther Hare.

2. The other lady is Janet Vickers born 19 Sept. 1870. she is the daughter
of Esther and RFV. She married Alex. Langlands. date ?.

3. The man is John Vickers, born 15 March 1896, son of Janet. His wife
was Janet Gibson. He must have been born prior to Janet's marriage,
otherwise his name would have been Langlands.

4. The child is Alex Vickers, John's son, 1920 -1999.

The photo was sent to me from Margo Vickers, born 1947. Her father was
William Vickers, married to Margaret Hay. (See family tree)
Margo contacted me through the web site "Genes Connected" a few weeks ago.

Source: Bob Scott, Australia

[H58] Source for all family: 1881 census

Family living in Peebles 1881

Lived at: 54 Northgate, 48 Northgate, 8 Eastgate, all in Peebles
Source, Nigel Harrity

[H59] An Engine Keeper
Dead before 1882

[H60] Dead before 1882

[H61] Ref: David Gee

[H62] Ref David Gee

[H63] Ref David Gee

Marriage needs to be verified, as do children
1881 census, 5 the Square, Dalkeith

1891 census in Dalkeith, only him and sons Ramsay and Andrew living there

Source of picture:

Hi John,

A new development which may interest you --

My son-in-law, John Flockhart Vickers, has just been given, by his uncle, John Vickers, two old portraits of his ancestors, one male, one female.

On the back of the male portrait is written:

"Restored July 1978

John Vickers

Ramsey Vickers

John Flockhart Vickers

John Vickers"

It seems to me that this indicates a line of descent, from John Vickers
(b.1836) to my John's uncle, John Vickers (b. c.1931)

The female portrait is simply labelled "Wife of John Vickers". If my theory is correct, this would be Euphemia Vickers (nee McQueen).

I imagine the portraits were made in the 1870s, and the fashion of the clothes worn would appear to support that date.

If you have been able to view the tree I sent you, you should be able to follow this line of descent. John Vickers was the great-great grandfather of my John Flockhart Vickers.

I can send you some scans of the portraits if you like. Let me know.

Best wishes,
Dave

dave@djmoore.fsnet.co.uk

[H64] In 1881 census, 134 High St Inveresk

Hi John

I am compiling a family history that includes Janet Jane Cunningham Vickers daughter of William Vickers and Ellen Selkirk. Janet was born in 1824 and married James Dobbie. They lived in and around Lasswade, Newtongrange just south of Edinburgh. James Dobbie was a coal miner and given the practices at the time Janet most probably worked in the mines as well either as a "bearer" or "pit brow lass".They migrated to Australia in 1852 to work on the goldfields and later moved to Newcastle to work in the coal mines there. Janet Vickers is my great great grandmother.

I am interested in any information you may have of this family which may or may not be part of your family line. I am also interested in tracing the relationship of Cunningham in Jane Vickers name. Some records suggest that the name may have been recorded at some stage as McVickers.

Regards

Ken Dobbie
ken.dobbie@bigpond.com

[H65] Ref David Gee

[H66] Ref David Gee

[H67] Ref David Gee

[H68] Ref David Gee

[H69] Ref David Gee

[H70] Ref David Gee

[H71] Ref David Gee

Mother of 2 illegitimate boys who resided with aunt Helen 1881 census (William & Helen Aytoun)

[H72] Ref David Gee

[H73] Ref David Gee

[H74] Ref David Gee

[H75] Ref David Gee

[H76] Ref David Gee

[H77] Ref David Gee

[H78] Ref David Gee

[H79] Ref David Gee
In 1881 Census living at Parkfoot, Newbattle

[H80] Ref David Gee

[H81] Ref David Gee

[H82] Ref David Gee

[H83] Ref David Gee

[H84] Ref David Gee
Family info from 1891 census

[H85] Ref David Gee

[H86] Ref David Gee

[H87] Source: Colin Wilson, Gorebridge

[H88] Source: Colin Wilson, Gorebridge

[H89] Ref: Colin Wilson

[H90] Source: Colin Wilson

[H91] Known as Jessie

[H92] Info from 1891 census

Info on wife & younger choildren, Eve pryde.

[N156] Pictures from Dave Moore dave@djmoore.fsnet.co.uk

[H93] Family info from 1891 census

Added to from 1901 census when living in a close off 80 High Street Dalkeith

Occupation wine and spirit merchant

[H94] GRO 685 6 Edinburgh source Melanie Mitchell by email.

[H95] To be verified if possible

[H96] To be verified if possible

[H97] A coal miner.

Source: Bob Scott

[H98] A dressmaker

[H99] A fitter & turner

[H100] 2 daughters, one is in Spain

[H101] Never married

[H102] Never married

[H103] Born in Station Cottages, Blair Atholl

[H104] Lived at Garryside, Blair Atholl at time of marriage
Witnesses at wedding Theodore Ledingham & E Campbell
Birth regd 29/6/1872 Keith, Scotland

[H105] Lived at Post Office House, Kiltarlity, at time of marriage

[H106] Address on wedding cert 61 Shiprow ??
Witnesses at wedding: James Robb, John Ledingham
Regd 9/1/1866 keith

Living at 27 Regent St Keith during 1881 census
and 65 same street in 1991 census

[H107] Lived at 52 Telford Rd, Inverness at time of mother's death

[H108] Boarder with edington family in Haddington in 1881 census. A joiner.

[H109] A baker in Inveresk in the 1881 census

[H110] In 1881 census, a baker living in Inveresk.

[H111] Agnes & her sibs Michael, Bridgit & John - no records apart from 1881 census found - source, Nigel Harrity

[H112] In 1881 census also had living with them at 46 Polton St ? town
Cockpen GRO ref 676 district 2

Robert Vicars 19 nephew coal miner, born Newbattle DOB 17/12/1861 (GRO)
Alexander Vicars 16 nephew Coal Miner, born Inveresk DOB 14/11/1864 (GRO)

Both boys are illegitimate, and their mother is Elizabeth Vickers, but which one?

[H113] Illegitimate

[H114] IGI

[H115] IGI

[H116] IGI
1881 census, Living in newbattle, a general labourer, with wife helen and 2 daughters Joan and Alice, both farm servants

[H117] IGI

[H118] Ref 1881 census

[H119] 1881 census

[H120] 1881 census

[H121] Source Cockpen OPR

[H122] Info from Helen Mason

[H123] 1891 census

[H124] Source: Joan Bock by email jbock@iinet.net

[H125] From Earsdon Northumberland
Source:

[H126] Source: Colin Wilson

[H127] Source Colin Wilson

[H128] Not in 1881 census.

Source - Nigel Harrity

[H129] illiterate - 9 Venlaw Ct Peebles

[H130] They moved after WW1 to Tolcross in Glasgow

[H131] Lived in Sydney Tce, Portobello

Source - Nigel Harrity

[H132] Lived in Roslynlee Estate, Lasswade, Midlothian

Source: Nigel Harrity

[H133] Died age 4

[H134] Worked at Peel Hospital

Source - Nigel Harrity
Lived at 11, Venlaw Court, Peebles

[H135] Source - Nigel harrity

[H136] Lives in NZ

Source - Nigel Harrity

[H137] Source - Nigel Harrity

[H138] Source - Nigel Harrity

[H139] Source - Nigel Harrity

[H140] Source - Nigel Harrity

[H141] Source - Nigel Harrity

[H142] Primrose Rd, South Gyle, Edinburgh

Source - Nigel Harrity

[H143] Live in Carlisle
Source - Nigel Harrity

[H144] Lives in Carlisle
Source - Nigel Harrity

[N157] Recorded on marriage cert as being apapermill worker from Kirkhill, Penicuik

[H145] All info on this family from Ramsay Carden Vickers of Canada. Ramsay Carden Vickers was killed in WWI. He was a policeman in West Calder before enlisting in the Argyll and Southern Highlanders.

From Commonwealth war graves site:

Debt of Honour Register

In Memory of

RAMSAY VICKERS

Lance Corporal
S/12179
10th Bn., Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

who died on
Tuesday 18 July 1916 .

Cemetery:
THIEPVAL MEMORIALSomme, France
Grave or Reference Panel
Number:
Pier and Face 15 A and 16 C
Location:
The Thiepval Memorial will be found on the D73, off the main
Bapaume to Albert road (D929). Each year a major ceremony is
held at the memorial on 1 July.
Visiting Information:
The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the
panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances
where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his
name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels.
Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to
determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name
within the quoted Panels.
Historical Information:
On 1 July 1916, supported by a French attack to the south, thirteen
divisions of Commonwealth forces launched an offensive on a line
from north of Gommecourt to Maricourt. Despite a preliminary
bombardment lasting seven days, the German defences were barely
touched and the attack met unexpectedly fierce resistance. Losses
were catastrophic and with only minimal advances on the southern
flank, the initial attack was a failure. In the following weeks, huge
resources of manpower and equipment were deployed in an attempt
to exploit the modest successes of the first day. However, the
German Army resisted tenaciously and repeated attacks and counter
attacks meant a major battle for every village, copse and farmhouse
gained. At the end of September, Thiepval was finally captured.
The village had been an original objective of 1 July. Attacks north
and east continued throughout October and into November in
increasingly difficult weather conditions. The Battle of the Somme
finally ended on 18 November with the onset of winter. In the
spring of 1917, the German forces fell back to their newly prepared
defences, the Hindenburg Line, and there were no further significant
engagements in the Somme sector until the Germans mounted their
major offensive in March 1918. The Thiepval Memorial, the
Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more
than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South
African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918
and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died
between July and November 1916. The memorial also serves as an
Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of
the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers
of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the
memorial. The memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was built
between 1928 and 1932 and unveiled by the Prince of Wales, in the
presence of the President of France, on 31 July 1932. The dead of
other Commonwealth countries who died on the Somme and have
no known graves are commemorated on national memorials
elsewhere.
Display Record of Commemoration

2000-2002 The Commonwealth War Graves Commission. All Rights Reserved.
Legal notices and terms of use

[H146] Emigrated to Canada 1953

[H147] I have a bit of info for you, an illegitimate child born to Esther Vickers nee Hare, after her husband had died:-

Descendants of Isabella Morrison Hare Vickers

Generation No. 1

1. ISABELLA MORRISON HARE4 VICKERS was born 3 December 1888 in Gowkshill, Midlothian, Scotland, UK1, and died Unknown. She married THOMAS LENNIE 29 May 1909 in 33 George IV Bridge, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, UK2, son of MARION LENNIE. He was born Abt. 1892, and died Bef. 10 August 1982.

Notes for ISABELLA MORRISON HARE VICKERS:

Record shows that Isabella Morrison Hare Vickers was born 3rd December 1888 at Gowkshill, illegitimate, daughter of Esther Hare, widow of Robert Vickers, Coalminer.

Marriage record shows that on 29th May 1909 at 33 George IV Bridge, Edinburgh, Isabella Hare Vickers, aged 20 years, Domestic Servant, Spinster, of 12 Gowkshill, Gorebridge, daughter of Esther Hare, Domestic Servant, subsequently married to Robert Vickers, Coalminer, married, T. Lennie, aged 20 years, Coal miner, Bachelor, of 1 Gowkshill, Gorebridge, son of Marion Lennie, Domestic Servant, deceased. Witnesses were William Lennie, Coalminer and Margaret Ramage, Carpet Factory Worker.

Isabella and Thomas were divorced on 15th November 1920 and he subsequently married her fourth cousin Elizabeth White Pryde.

More About ISABELLA MORRISON HARE VICKERS:

Occupation: 29 May 1909, Domestic Servant2

Notes for THOMAS LENNIE:

Married in 1909 to Isabella Hare Vickers, and was divorced from her in November 1920.

Was witness, along with his wife-to-be Elizabeth White Pryde, at the marriage of her sister Marion to John Pryde at Stobhill on 21st May 1915. He married Elizabeth White Pryde, who was fourth cousin to his first wife, in December 1921.

More About THOMAS LENNIE:

Occupation: Bef. August 1982, Drainer (Builders)3

Endnotes

1. *Birth record for person referred to, Stobhill 1888 698B/113.

2. *Marriage Record of person referred to, St. Giles, Edinburgh 1909 685/4/288.

3. Death Record, of wife gives occupation of deceased husband as Drainer (Builders).

[H148] Source: Margo Williamson
Magswilliamson@aol.com

[H149] All this family & descendants from Margo Vickers Magswilliamson@aol.com

[H150] Source: Margo Williamson

[H151] Died 21 pneumonia

[H152] Source Joan Murray

joanmurray@netbreeze.co.uk

[N158] Papermill worker, dead in 1918 according to daughter Mary's marriage cert

[N159] Info from 1901 census

[N160] Info from 1901 census

[N162] A mason according to daughter Agnes's death certificate


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